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Religious Practices Committee Policies Under Review

Kashrut policy for congregational events offsite:

The Religious Practices Committee (RPC) invites congregational input into the appropriate policy governing kashrut standards at congregation-sponsored events held outside of BI’s own building and grounds (this would include, for example, Guess Who’s Coming to Shabbat dinners and Rosh Chodesh group gatherings). The RPC is not seeking comment on the existing kashrut policy, which can be found in the members only section of the BI website. We are, however, considering the following addition to that policy:

Alternative A

At events identified as Congregation Beth Israel (CBI) activities that occur outside of CBI and its grounds (including in members’ homes), food is expected to be dairy/vegetarian, just as at events held at CBI. Hosts and/or organizers will require participants who supply food to avoid serving foods that are treif (specifically, pork and shellfish products). Hosts and/or organizers are also required to communicate ahead of time to those invited to an event if it is expected that foods other than dairy/vegetarian are to be served. Meat (including chicken and other poultry) must be kosher, but a subsidy may be available if the cost of kosher meat imposes an undue hardship.

Alternative B

At events identified as Congregation Beth Israel (CBI) activities that occur outside of CBI and its grounds (including in members’ homes), food is expected to be dairy/vegetarian, just as at events held at CBI. Hosts and/or organizers are asked to request participants who supply food to avoid serving foods that are treif (specifically, pork and shellfish products). Hosts and/or organizers are also requested to communicate ahead of time to those invited to an event if it is expected that foods other than dairy/vegetarian are to be served. There is no requirement that meat (including chicken and other poultry) be kosher, but non-kosher meat products should be identified as such so that anyone who avoids such products is able to do so.

The RPC believes that this proposal should serve multiple and sometimes competing values, such as (1) adherence and connection to tradition, (2) sensitivity to environmental and social impact, (3) recognition of diverse dietary needs, (4) inclusivity and being welcoming to all people, including members of various streams of Judaism, and (5) conveying our values to the outside world.

Members who wish to comment on this proposal or inquire about it should contact Larry Hamermesh, RPC Chair.

 

 

 

Tue, October 15 2019 16 Tishrei 5780